Thursday, March 17, 2016

International Flavors Abound at Busy Gambian Market on Africa's West Coast

Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
A van makes its way through the crowded Serrekunda Market in The Gambia.

By Lama Jallow
Reporter
SERREKUNDA, The Gambia – From producers to consumers, wholesalers to retailers, Serrekunda Market is one of the busiest markets in The Gambia.
People come from faraway places to sell their products and then go home and prepare for the next day.
Djula traders, who are long distance traders coming from the north and upper river regions, cross the River Gambia from Barra to Banjul and continue to Serrekunda where they will sell their goods.

Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
Vegetables for sale in the Serrekunda Market.
Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
Many people who sell goods in the busy Serrekunda Market use an umbrella to stay out of the sun.
Googlemaps
The Serrekunda market on the tip
 of The Gambia. Traders cross
the River Gambia from Barra
to Banjul to reach the market.
Click on the map to enlarge.
Googlemaps
The red pin marking Serrekunda in The Gambia shows
it in the context of northwestern Africa geography.
Click on the map to enlarge.

As one of the busiest markets around, food stuffs, clothes, furniture and other materials are in abundance.
Food is imported from Nigeria mainly from Gari. Some of this food has now become part of the Gambian dishes.
Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
Fresh local produce for sale at the Serrekunda Market.
Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
Fresh fish at a vendor stand.
Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
Dried fish for sale at the market.


Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
The rooftop of a building offers a perfect view of the bustling market below.
Lama Jallow / youthjournalism.org
Shoppers and vendors in the market.
Lama Jallow / 
youthjournalism.org

The market is mostly controlled by foreigner, mainly from Conakry, Guinea; Nigeria, Senegal and other places.
Many people come and buy food stuffs and sell them in their local markets. Goods are often cheaper in Serrekunda than in their regions.
Tourists from different countries visit the market often with their cameras to take pictures. Others buy African foods to cook and eat.
Religious differences do not mean people have to be separated at the market. Christians and Muslims interact and often buy goods from each other, which paves the way for an absolutely fantastic atmosphere in the market.


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