Saturday, December 12, 2015

Paris Sculpture Of Melting Ice Draws Attention To Climate Change

Selvaganeshamoorthi Balakrishnan / youthjournalism.org
Outside the Place du Pantheon in Paris on Saturday, people stop to look at Ice Watch, a public art installation about climate change.

By Selvaganeshamoorthi Balakrishnan
Reporter
PARIS, France – Recent visitors to the Place du Pantheon in Paris immediately notice a bizarre piece of art at the entrance.
A dozen large blocks of ice, taken from icebergs off the coast of Greenland, are arranged in a circle outside the building.
Ice Watch, a work of sculpture by artist Olafur Eliasson and geologist Minik Rosing, aims to highlight the detrimental effects of climate change. 
It was installed last week to coincide with the United Nations Climate Summit in Paris.
The slow melting of the chunks of ice in front of the Parisian landmark mirrored the melting of ice sheets from climate change.
The circular placement of the ice blocks – in the same shape as a clock – emphasized the urgency of tackling global warming.
Selvaganeshamoorthi Balakrishnan / youthjournalism.org
The chunks of ice in the Ice Watch sculpture are arranged in the shape of a clock face.
Selvaganeshamoorthi Balakrishnan /
youthjournalism.org

One of the pieces of melting ice.
In a statement on the Ice Watch website, Rosing, a professor of geology at the Natural History Museum of Denmark at the University of Copenhagen, said, “Science and technology have made it possible for us to destabilize Earth’s climate, but now that we understand the mechanisms behind these changes, we have the power to prevent them from growing.”
Visitors are noticing the melting blocks of ice. On Saturday afternoon, many were snapping photos and touching the installation.
According to information released by the artists and their sponsors, the 80 tons of ice came from free-floating blocks from a fjord outside of Nuuk, Greenland.
The ice sculpture is part of the Artists4ParisClimate2015, which is working to use public art projects to mobilize public opinion about climate change, according to the Ice Watch website.
Whether the intended message resonated among visitors and dignitaries, however, is anyone's guess. 
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