Wednesday, September 30, 2009

YJI writers up to speed on Usain Bolt, German elections, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and more

The new issue of The Tattoo, which is online now, features Youth Journalism International news stories about the German election and a plane crash in South Africa along with three reviews of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and a photo page featuring Usain "Lightning" Bolt during his stop this week at the ESPN campus in Bristol, Connecticut.
Youth Journalism International senior reporter Kiernan Majerus-Collins, from Connecticut, took photographs of Bolt before, during and after the speedy Jamaican raced ESPN employees. You can see them here. They also appeared in The Bristol (Conn.) Press.
He also chipped in a glowing review of the rock museum. Two other reporters, Katherine Holland, of Pennsylvania, and Mary Majerus-Collins, of Connecticut, had a different take on it. They actually thought it was booooring. Read all the reviews here.
We also have senior reporter Katie Grosser's story about the German election Sunday, which we published last weekend. Grosser lives in Germany. To get a sense of what young German voters were thinking, check it out here.
And junior reporter Nicole Megan Gounder gets extra credit for racing to the scene of breaking news in her Durban, South Africa hometown after a passenger jet crash landed in a nearby schoolyard. Fortunately, there were no passengers aboard at the time and all four of those badly injured are expected to recover. But as Gounder reports, if it hadn't happened on a national holiday, it could have been a terrible disaster because the plane came down right where kids love to gather before school begins. Read her story here.
As always, we appreciate your constructive criticism, tips and suggestions. We'd love for you to pass this along to anyone teens in your life (or those who care about young people).
We love giving young people a voice.
There's more in the works, of course, and hope you'll check out ReadTheTatto.com's vast archives as well. If you've never read it, we especially recommend Samantha Perez's stunning journal of surviving Hurricane Katrina.
You can also follow Youth Journalism International, our educational wing, on Twitter @yjinternational and on Facebook by becoming a Fan of Youth Journalism International.
Thanks so much for your support.

Saturday, September 26, 2009

YJI senior reporter takes on German election

Youth Journalism Internatkional senior reporter Katie Grosser lets the world know what young voters in Germany are thinking as the country heads to the polls to elect a new parliament and perhaps a new government, too. Read all about it here.
For those who don't know, The Tattoo is an online newspaper featuring the work of young writers in more than 20 countries and most U.S. states, including many in our home state of Connecticut. It's in its 16th year and won many, many awards for some stellar work.
You can follow it online at http://www.readthetattoo.com/ and http://www.youthjournalism.org/, along with social media sites. It's at www.facebook.com/youthjournalism and on Twitter @yjinternational.

Monday, September 7, 2009

YJI goes Inside ESPN to find out what makes it tick

Thirty years ago this evening, a new sports network began broadcasting out of a trailer in Bristol, Connecticut. That tiny operation has grown over the past three decades to become the worldwide leader in sports, with its headquarters looking ever more like a major college campus and that trailer just a distant memory. It has thousands of employees and fans in every country. To celebrate the anniversary, two Youth Journalist International reporters from Connecticut, Clare Hern and Kiernan Majerus-Collins, ventured inside to find out what makes ESPN tick. Their work -- a stellar package of seven stories with lots of pictures, is online now at ReadTheTattoo.com
It's a great read, the perfect subject for The Tattoo's 200th issue.
Earlier Tattoo stories about ESPN by alums Collins Seguin, T.J. O'Connor and Justin Skaradosky, are also online. Check out the links on our "Latest Issue" page.
We hope you'll read carefully and let us know how we're doing. We're always eager for tips, suggestions, constructive criticism and any help anyone can offer.
The Tattoo is a teen-written, online newspaper that began 15 years ago and has grown into the world's premier showcase for youth journalism. Youth Journalism International, the educational nonprofit that works with the students, is busy every day helping young writers in many countries learn the craft and build bonds across borders with their colleagues across the globe.
Thanks so much for your support of youth journalism.