Monday, November 30, 2009

Young journalists cover everything from Legos to Limerick


Composers Row: (from left to right) Gerald Shapiro, Robert Carl, Neely Bruce and Ken Steen at the Mitchell College performance of Bruce's "The Bill of Rights: Ten Amendments in Eight Motets." Shapiro is a professor of music at Brown University, where he is chair of the music department. Carl is chair of the composition department at The Hartt School, University of Hartford. Bruce is a professor music at Wesleyan University. Steen is an associate professor of composition and music theory at The Hartt School. (Photo by Kiernan Majerus-Collins/youthjournalism.org)

We've got not one, but two new issues at ReadTheTattoo.com that are chock full of great stuff for you to read from the talented young writers at Youth Journalism International.
Today's issue focuses mostly on American Composers, a group that probably doesn't get its share of ink. YJI Senior Reporter Kienan Majerus-Collins has a package of stories that include pieces on Wesleyan composer Neely Bruce, Hartt School composer Robert Carl and one describing what it was like to play in the band for a world premiere of a new piece of music from the Hartt School's David Macbride. There's also a story about Bruce's fascinating decision to put the Bill of Rights to music, an idea that any journalist has to love.
Also in today's issue is a story from Mumbai, India about how the city is coping one year after the terrible terrorist attack that left 170 people dead and many others wounded. It's the first piece by YJI newcomer Shagorika Ghosh.
Let's not forget last week's issue either.
Limerick, Ireland teen Marese Heffernan, a YJI veteran, wrote about the lingering memory of writer Frank McCourt in the byways of her old city. She also took some pretty good pictures, which is always welcome.
We also have a couple of stories from the first-ever Lego Kidsfest in Hartford, Connecticut that a team of YJI reporters turned out on deadline. Check out the stories and photos by Clare Hern, Kiernan Majerus-Collins, Francis Byrne, Mary Majerus-Collins and Yelena Samofalova.
We also encourage you to poke around on The Tattoo's website, where there are at least 1,500 stories stretching back over 15 years. Collectively, they easily represent the best teen journalism in the world. There is some wonderful stuff.
We're always eager for suggestions, tips, constructive criticism and any other help anyone can offer. Youth Journalism International's application to the IRS for nonprofit status remains pending, by the way. We'll keep you updated on any news about it.
Thanks for reading and thanks for your support of these great young writers from across the globe.

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